climate migration

Climate change, migration and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

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This briefing looks at the anticipated impacts of climate-induced migration on efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) on climate change – SDG13. More specifically, this briefing describes the SDG targets relating to climate change, and the particular challenges to each in the context of increasing climate-induced migration.

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Kiribati: Climate Change and Migration - Relationships Between Household Vulnerability, Human Mobility and Climate Change

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The Pacific Climate Change and Migration (PCCM) project has two main goals:

- Increase the protection of individuals and communities which are vulnerable to climate change displacement and migration through targeted national and regional policies;

- Increase labour mobility opportunities for Pacific Islanders, through well-managed labour migration schemes.

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Tuvalu: Climate Change and Migration: Relationships Between Household Vulnerability, Human Mobility and Climate Change

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The main goals of the Pacific Climate Change and Migration (PCCM) project are twofold:

- To increase protection of individuals and communities that are vulnerable to climate change displacement and migration through targeted national and regional policies; and

English

The gathering storm of climate migration

Visceral, heart-rending images of war lend urgency to policy debates about whether and how to accommodate — or not — people driven from their homes, communities and countries. But more people are displaced by climate-related events than conflict, and international agreements have so far said little about the likely surge of people who will uproot themselves and their families as climate change impacts intensify.

Crisis and Climate Change Driving Unprecedented Migration

Climate change is now adding new layers of complexity to the nexus between migration and the environment. Coastal populations are at particular risk as a global rise in temperature of between 1.1 and 3.1 degrees C would increase the mean sea level by 0.36 to 0.73 meters by 2100, adversely impacting low-lying areas with submergence, flooding, erosion, and saltwater intrusion, according to the UN Environment Programme (UNEP). But even before such catastrophes strike, the 660 to 820 million people who depend on a fishing livelihood – more so subsistence-based traditional fis

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